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Prof Chris O’Callaghan

Fellow in Medicine

Professor of Medicine

Dean, Senior Treasurer of the JCR

Introduction

I was an undergraduate and clinical student at Queen’s and then worked in a number of London hospitals including Guy’s, Lewisham, St Thomas’, Hammersmith and the Royal Brompton hospital. I returned to Oxford for my doctoral studies as a Medical Research Council Training Fellow. Following further clinical training I took up a Medical Research Council Clinician Scientist Fellowship and then spent a number of years as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco and subsequently at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). I returned to Oxford in 2002, taking up a Medical Research Council Senior Fellowship in 2004, becoming a Reader in 2006 and Professor in 2011. I head a research group in the Nuffield Department of Medicine, practice clinical medicine as a consultant in general medicine and nephrology at the John Radcliffe and Churchill hospitals and teach clinical medical students. I am Senior Treasurer of the Junior Common Room (JCR).

Teaching

At Queen’s I teach clinical medicine through a combination of bedside teaching in the hospital and tutorial teaching in the quieter atmosphere of college. I am a great believer in the value of the tutorial approach in the teaching of clinical medicine. I also supervise MSc and DPhil students in my research group.

Research

My research interest is in the role of human innate immunity in disease, especially in atherosclerotic vascular disease. I am interested in understanding the recognition of diseased cells or pathogens and using this knowledge to design new therapies. This is an important field because the immune system plays a major role in a wide range of human diseases. I am also interested in understanding chronic kidney disease, how it causes vascular disease and how to manage it. My laboratory uses a wide range of research approaches including structural, molecular and cellular biology and studies involving patients.

Publications

Lin D, Lavender H, Soilleux E, O’Callaghan CA. NF-kappa B regulates MICA transcription in endothelial cells through a genetically inhibitable control site. J Biol Chem. 287:4299-310. (2012).

Watson AA, Lebedev AA, Hall BA, Fenton-May AE, Vagin AA, Dejnirattisai W, Mongkolsapaya J, Felce J, Palma AS, Liu Y, Feizi T, Screaton GR, Murshudov GN, O’Callaghan CA. Structural flexibility of the macrophage dengue virus receptor CLEC5A:Implications for ligand binding and signaling. J Biol Chem 286:24208-18. (2011).

O’Callaghan CA, Shine B, Lasserson DS. Chronic kidney disease: a large scale population-based study of the effects of introducing the CKP-EPI formula for eGFR reporting. BMJ Open 1(2):e000308. (2011).

Morteau O, Blundell S, Chakera A, Bennett, S, Christou CM, Mason PD, Cornall RJ, O’Callaghan CA. Renal transplant immunosuppression impairs natural killer cell function in vitro and in vivo. PLoS One. 5. pii: e13294 (2010).

Herrington W.G., Al-Mossawi M.H., Roberts I.S., O’Callaghan C.A. The hyponatraemic hairdresser: highlighting the differentials. Lancet. 374:1392. (2009).

O’Callaghan C.A. The Renal system at a Glance. (Third Edition). Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford. (2009).

 

For a fuller list see – http://www.ccmp.ox.ac.uk/publications-3