Viewing archives for Career Development Fellow

Introduction

I grew up in Hoboken, New Jersey, across the Hudson River from downtown Manhattan. I completed a BA in Comparative Literature and History of Art and Architecture at Brown University in 2015, followed by an MPhil in European and Comparative Literatures and Cultures at the University of Cambridge in 2016. I spent two years teaching high school history in Connecticut before returning to Cambridge to pursue a PhD in French with funding from the Gates Cambridge Scholarship programme. I joined Queen’s as a Career Development Fellow in French in the autumn of 2022.

Teaching

I teach French Literature, with a focus on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, across the first-year course and FHS. I also teach translation into English.

Research

My research demonstrates a preoccupation with the relationship between communication and power in early modern French literature. My doctoral thesis explores Michel de Montaigne’s conception in the Essais of the mechanics of communication, as well as the ways communication influences and is influenced by social and political structures. Adopting a theoretical approach rooted in pragmatic language philosophy, with a particular focus on relevance theory’s cognitively-inflected account of utterance interpretation, the thesis examines Montaigne’s portrayals of communication in four contexts: conversation and civility, diplomacy, jurisprudence, and prayer and exegesis. The sustained use of a pragmatic framework to analyse Montaigne’s evocations of seemingly disparate communicative domains, typically treated separately by intellectual history, reveals patterns in his thinking that traverse these domains.

My next project, provisionally entitled ‘“Ces mots semblent être des charmes”: Speech, Authority, and Force in the Tragedies of Corneille and Racine’, explores the instrumentality of authoritative speech in seventeenth-century French tragedy. Homing in the speech of monarchs and oracles in particular, it considers how these figures take advantage of, or circumvent, communicative conventions to influence and construct social and political realities. A pragmatics-oriented analysis of forceful speech offers a new means of comparing and contrasting the canonical works of Corneille and Racine. The project also incorporates works by their contemporaries, including Catherine Bernard and Jean Rotrou, to offer an analysis of how monarchical and oracular speech operate in the broader realm of seventeenth-century theatrical theory and practice.

Publications

‘A Message from the Margins: The Role of the Infante in Corneille’s Le Cid’, French Studies, Volume 74, Issue 4(2020), 519-535. https://doi.org/10.1093/fs/knaa166.

 ‘Words, Meaning and Force: The Placebo Effect in Montaigne’s Essais and Vair’s Des Charmes’, Montaigne Studies 29 (2017), 213-224.

 ‘“Le plus fructueux et naturel exercise de nostre esprit”: Conversation et domaine public dans les œuvres de Montaigne, Guazzo, et Castiglione’, Bulletin de la Societé internationale des amis de Montaigne, 73 (2021), 199-212.

Introduction

I studied philosophy at LMU Munich before moving to Oxford to complete the BPhil in Philosophy at New College, Oxford. I then went on to do my PhD in Philosophy at New York University. Prior to taking up my current post at Queen’s I was the Stalnaker Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy at MIT.

Teaching

I teach philosophy to undergraduates in all years at Queen’s. I teach the General Philosophy, Introduction to Logic, and Moral Philosophy first-year papers. Moreover, I give tutorials throughout theoretical philosophy, ethics, history of philosophy, and history of logic.

Research

My main research interests lie at the intersection of metaphysics and logic. I am especially interested in general questions about the structure of reality and the nature of necessity and possibility. My work employs tools from higher-order logic to frame and investigate such questions. Higher-order logic is a formal framework with particularly rich expressive resources, making it ideally suited for precisely articulating highly general questions about the structure of reality and the nature of modality, properties, relations, and states of affairs. I have another ongoing research project in the history of logic in which I explore the algebraic tradition of logic in the 19th century, and I have additional research interests in epistemology and the philosophy of language.

Publications

‘Fine on the Possibility of Vagueness’. To appear in Outstanding Contributions to

Logic: Kit Fine, ed. by F.L.G Faroldi and F. Van de Putte, Springer.

‘Essence and Necessity’. Journal of Philosophical Logic, 51 (3): 653-690. 2022.

‘The Reduction of Necessity to Essence’. Mind, 129 (514): 351-380. 2020.

‘Why Intellectualism Still Fails’. The Philosophical Quarterly, 66: 500-515. 2016.

For a complete list of my publications, please visit www.andreasditter.com


Introduction

I read philosophy at Oxford before working in privacy law in both public and private sectors. I studied law part-time in London, and then returned to Oxford for the BCL, MPhil and DPhil. I have previously taught law and legal philosophy at St Peter’s College and Worcester College, and political philosophy at the Blavatnik School of Government.

Research

My work lies in moral, political, and legal philosophy, including the philosophical foundations of doctrinal law.  I am particularly interested in the nature and methodology of normative theories; the relationship between the moral and the political, and its application to questions about the normative foundations of public, private, and criminal law; and the connections between democracy, authority, justice, and legitimacy.


Introduction

I grew up in Virginia just outside of Washington, DC. I studied French and English at the College of William and Mary and then did my Masters and PhD in French at Princeton University. At Princeton I was a member of l’Avant-Scène, a French-language acting troupe. My thesis, however, focused on Paris and I spent a year of my PhD at ENS-Ulm. I arrived at Queen’s in 2018 as a Junior Research Fellow and I’m now a Career Development Fellow in French.

Teaching

I teach Modern French Literature (nineteenth century to the present) and translation into English. I also lead an annual workshop devoted to French theatre in performance.

Research

I’m interested in the intersection of the body and media. My first book, Paris and the Parasite: Noise, Health, and Politics in the Media City (MIT Press, 2021), builds on work by the French philosopher Michel Serres. He draws attention to the four meanings of “parasite” in French: an uninvited guest, a harmful organism, a mooch, and noise. He argues that these four meanings are intertwined. I apply this idea to urbanism, asking who and what constitute the parasites of Paris. The city has been shaped by what I call anti-parasitic urbanism: the prioritization of cleanliness, order, efficiency and clarity at the expense of the city’s social mixity, its biodiversity, and its capacity to surprise us. Through close readings of texts and practices that challenge the anti-parasitism of the city (including street art and parkour, protests and riots, literature and film), I argue for a radically different approach to urbanism and urban life.

My second book project, tentatively entitled Staging Presence, examines how technology is changing the conceptualization of the body in contemporary French theatre. For a long time, French theatre was distinguished by its focus on the voice and its disregard for the body. Proust, for instance, writes of wanting to “hear” an actress in a play rather than see her. Lately, that has begun to change, with acting schools now offering classes in Alexander Technique, movement and dance, and yoga. That transformation has coincided with the appearance of new media technologies onstage that challenge what it means for theatre to be “live” art. The book will explore the connections between those two trends, and ask what French theatre can tell us about broader societal anxieties regarding new media, attention, and what it means to “be present.” It will look at theatrical performances and rehearsal methods, acting theory and pedagogy, neuroscience, and French philosophy.

Publications

  • ‘The Icon, the Exile: Dante in Contemporary Italian Street Art,’ Dante Alive, edited by Simone Marchesi and Francesco Ciabattoni, forthcoming from Routledge, 2022.
  • Paris and the Parasite: Noise, Health, and Politics in the Media City. MIT Press, 2021.
  • ‘Between Memory and Mobilization: The Graffiti and Street Art of the Paris Commune,’ Nineteenth-Century French Studies 49, no. 3 (2021): 238-257.
  • ‘Le Groupe fait de/du bruit: communication et communauté dans Mort de quelqu’un de Jules Romains,’ Modern Language Notes, 134, no. 4 (2019): 764-782.
  • ‘What Dies in the Street: Camus’s La Peste and Infected Networks,’ French Forum 41, no. 3 (2017): 192-207.


Introduction

I am a post-doctoral Career Development Fellow at The Queen’s College and the Department of Economics, University of Oxford. Prior to coming to Oxford in 2019 I received my PhD from the European University Institute, Florence, Italy. Before that I completed my undergraduate studies at Utrecht University, the Netherlands, and obtained my graduate degree with scholarship from the Barcelona Graduate School of Economics. During my studies I have also been a visiting scholar at Washington University in St. Louis, University of Madison, Wisconsin and the Bank of England.

Teaching

I am the lead Economics tutor at Queen’s and as such organise the Economics side of the Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) degree as well as teach Macroeconomics to Queen’s PPE students. I also teach Macroeconomics classes for MPhil students at the Department of Economics.

Research

My research explores two distinct topics in economics. One of them is the study of the importance of expectations, bounded rationality and incomplete knowledge in understanding macroeconomic phenomena. The second focuses on cross-country differences in productivity and firm dynamics, and in particular the role that technology-skill complementarities play in their evolution. Although seemingly unrelated, I view my work on expectations and deviations from rationality as my business cycle side, while my research on cross-country differences has a structural long-term focus.

Publications

Please see my website for research updates and a full list of publications.


Introduction

After attending local state schools, I studied History at the University of Cambridge and went on to do a Masters in Historic Conservation at Oxford Brookes University. I worked in London as a historic buildings consultant for a year, then did my PhD in History at Bangor University. I was the Economic History Society Postan Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research before taking up my current post at Queen’s in autumn 2021.

Teaching

I teach late medieval and early modern British and European history. I also contribute to College teaching in historical methods and approaches.

Research

With a particular focus on early modern Wales, I am broadly interested in gentry culture and society in early modern Britain and Britain’s engagement with the world. I am currently completing a monograph, based on my doctoral thesis, which uses the example of the Welsh gentry to demonstrate the strength of regional identity in early modern Britain. While at Queen’s, I am also starting my second book project which examines early modern Welsh colonial activity in North America, including its impact on Indigenous peoples and its role in the construction of British imperialism.

Publications

  • ‘“By reason of her sex and widowhood”: An early modern Welsh gentlewoman in the Court of Star Chamber’, in K. J. Kesselring and N. Mears (eds), Star Chamber Matters: The Court and its Records (London: University of London Press, 2021), pp. 79–96.
  • ‘Credibility in the Court of Chancery: Salesbury v Bagot, 1671–1677’, The Seventeenth Century, 36 (2021), 55–79.
  • ‘Officeholding and local politics in early modern Wales: A study of the Salesburys of Rhug and Bachymbyd, c.1536–1621’, Welsh History Review, 30 (2020), 206–32.


Introduction

I grew up in Oxfordshire, where I attended my local comprehensive before going on to study English Literature at Royal Holloway, University of London. I stayed on to complete an MA in Shakespeare studies, and an AHRC funded PhD on ecstasy and ecstatic experience in the work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. I have taught at Royal Holloway and Shakespeare’s Globe, London, where I was Research Coordinator for five years, before joining Queen’s in autumn 2020.

Teaching

I teach papers on English Literature from 1550-1760, including Shakespeare.

Research

My research focuses on the intersections of early modern literature (primarily Shakespearean), medicine, and philosophy, with a particular interest in emotion and embodiment.

My current book project, provisionally titled Ecstatic Subjects: Ecstasy in the Work of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, considers how experiences of ecstasy captured the early modern imagination. Informed and intrigued by ‘ecstasy’ as a word and state that encompasses a wide range of senses, this study explores what it meant to ‘suffer ecstasy’ in early modern culture, and what is at stake for the Shakespearean subjects who encounter this altered state of consciousness.

I am also working on a project that attends to issues of distraction at Shakespeare’s Globe. Drawing on scholarly research, artist experience, and audience behaviour, this study takes a historical and contemporary approach to performance at the Globe in order to show how distraction creates theatrical meaning.

My other recent and ongoing research considers experiences at the edge of consciousness in early modern literature and culture, the history of emotion, early modern medicine, embodiment and the senses, and issues of subjectivity.

Publications

  • ‘Suffering Ecstasy: Othello and the Drama of Displacement’, Shakespeare Survey, vol. 75 (2022)
  • ‘“Mark how he trembles in his ecstasy”: Space, Place, and Self in The Comedy of Errors’, Shakespeare Studies, vol. 28 (2020)
  • ‘“Amorous pinches”: Keeping (in)tact in Antony and Cleopatra’, in Shakespeare/Sense: Contemporary Readings in Sensory Culture, ed. Simon Smith (Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2020)
  • ‘Metaphorically Speaking: Shakespeare and the Limits of Utterance’, in Titus Andronicus: The State of Play, ed. Farah Karim-Cooper (Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2019)
  • ‘Shakespeare’s Textual Bodies’, Discovering Shakespeare, British Library (2016)