Viewing archives for Junior Research Fellows

Introduction

I studied medicine at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. I then moved to London to do an MSc in Neuroscience at UCL followed by a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience. After receiving my PhD in 2017 I moved to Oxford. I have since been working at the department of Experimental Psychology and the Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging (WIN).

Teaching

I am module leader for the Behavioural Neuroscience Core Practical.

Research

When performing a voluntary action, one has to decide not only which action to choose but whether, at any given point in time, it is worth taking any action as opposed to doing nothing at all, given the potential benefits of acting in a particular environment.  My aim is to understand how the environmental context influences the willingness to initiate a volitional action and how it exerts this influence via brain circuits.  Understanding such process are important because impairments in decisions about if and when to act are observed across a wide range of brain disorders such as apathy and impulsivity.

To answer this question, I design behavioural paradigms in which humans and/or non-human primates (NHPs) make decisions about when it is worth acting. While humans/NHPs are performing the task, I record their brain activity with electroencephalogram (EEG) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). I then use non-invasive brain stimulation methods such as transcranial ultrasound (TUS) to identify the causal relationship between the brain activity and behaviour.

Publications

Please visit my department page.

Introduction

My research concentrates on global governance and survey methods. Through my work, I aim to find out how people want the world to be governed, and to help other scholars conduct better public opinion research. Before joining Queen’s, I held postdoctoral fellowships at the universities of Lund and Maastricht. A former management consultant at Bain & Company, I also worked at the German Foreign Ministry, for the President of the European Parliament, and at the United Nations headquarters in New York. I hold a DPhil in International Relations from the University of Oxford, an MA in Global Affairs from Yale University, and a BSc in Management from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

Teaching

I have developed and taught various quantitative and qualitative courses. In Oxford, I taught Political Analysis (Q-Step) II – an intermediary course on quantitative methods. In Maastricht, I taught introductory courses on quantitative methods and International Relations. For the German Academic Scholarship Foundation (Studienstiftung), I developed and taught a summer academy on the theory, empirics, and practice of global democracy.

Research

My two main research areas are global governance and survey methods.

During my JRF, I am working on a monograph and various articles relating to world public opinion on international organizations, global governance reforms, and long-term visions like global democracy. To this end, I use survey experiments to understand international public attitudes and explore the conditions under which people’s views may change.

In the area of survey methods, I am working on various papers addressing methodological questions that affect survey researchers in many academic disciplines. I particularly focus on the design of answer choices, e.g. the ideal length of response scales, the conditions under which a middle response should be included (or not), and the validity of non-opinion (“don’t know”) responses.

Publications

My list of publications is available here: www.linkedin.com/in/farsanghassim.


Introduction

A product of the Italian state education system, I went to school in the provinces of Milan and Brescia and read Classics at the University of Padua (2010-13). I further pursued my passion for ancient cultures and literatures by doing an MPhil and PhD in Classics at Magdalene and Emmanuel College, Cambridge (2013-18). Then I worked as a Language Teaching Officer in the Faculty of Classics at Cambridge (2018-20); I also was Bye-Fellow at Emmanuel College and Teaching Associate at Queens’ College (2019-20). I moved to Oxford and took up my three-year Research Fellowship at The Queen’s College in October 2020.

Teaching

I am happy to supervise undergraduate theses in Classics or History on topics such as Latin literature (Cicero and early imperial prose) and Latin textual criticism (including palaeography).

Research

Broadly, my research focuses on the reception of Latin literature from Antiquity to our times. In my doctoral thesis I studied the textual history of Cicero’s letters to Atticus in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. I am currently working my thesis into a monograph, and in the long term I plan to re-edit the whole of Cicero’s correspondence.

As a Research Fellow in Classics at The Queen’s College, I am studying a phenomenon of transmission that goes by the name of interpolation – that is, the insertion of non-authorial matter into a text. Specifically, I am surveying, comparing, and trying to explain the different attitudes of critics and readers towards interpolation in Latin classical texts from Antiquity to the Enlightenment.

Research Talk

The video below is of an online talk that I gave for the Queen’s College Symposium in November, 2020 entitled: ‘”This is not what I wrote”. Three ancient victims of forgery, interpolation & fake news.’

Outreach

I am the Outreach Officer for the Centre for Manuscript and Text Cultures (CMTC) at Queen’s. My new podcast interview series can be found on YouTube or wherever you get your podcasts.


Introduction

I am from Madagascar, having grown up in a village called Soavinandriana, Itasy.

I started my scientific journey in earnest when I moved to France in 2011 and completed a BSc and an MSc in Life Sciences at the University of Strasbourg. Inspired by my master project to continue in the field of structural biochemistry, I moved to Bordeaux in 2016 and spent time as a graduate student at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM, nouvelle-Aquitaine, France). In 2019, I obtained my PhD from the University of Bordeaux with the dissertation “Understanding the roles of the Nob1/PNo1 and RPS14/Cinap complexes in the cytoplasmic maturation of the small subunit (pre-40S) in eukaryotes”.

In 2020, I took up an exciting new position and joined the Biochemistry Department in Oxford, working as a post-doctoral researcher within the Seiradake Group.

Building on this experience, I will join the Queen’s College Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow (October 2021), presenting a fantastic opportunity to expand my research into new areas.

Research

Broadly speaking, my research to date has been in studying proteins or ‘worker molecules’ within cells. Based on their functions, there are different types of proteins including antibodies, chaperones, enzymes, hormones, and receptors.

Specifically, my research project aims to study the biological properties of cell surface receptors in the nervous and vascular systems through the use of approaches including bioinformatics, molecular biology (cloning), biochemistry (recombinant protein expression and purification) and structure determination using x-ray crystallography.

During my Fellowship, I will also undertake structural and functional studies on large receptors with the aim of applying additional techniques such as cell biology and cryo-electron microscopy.

Understanding how these receptors function on the molecular level is important in order to decipher their roles in different biological processes and any related diseases.

Publications

Raoelijaona, Finaritra, Stéphane Thore, and Sébastien Fribourg. ‘Domain Definition and Interaction Mapping for the Endonuclease Complex hNob1/hPno1’. RNA Biology 15, no. 9 (2018): 1174–80. https://doi.org/10.1080/15476286.2018.1517013.


Introduction

I studied Law, Political Science and International Relations at Masaryk University in Czechia, where I also completed a PhD in Constitutional Law and Politics. My dissertation analyzed the role of East-Central European constitutional courts in the implementation of international human rights law. Previously, I earned an LLM in International Legal Studies at New York University School of Law where I studied as a Hauser Global Scholar. During my doctoral studies, I was a visiting scholar at PluriCourts (Oslo) and Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya (Israel).

Before joining Queen’s, I was a Researcher at the Judicial Studies Institute (Czechia) participating in an ERC-funded research project. I focused on the study of domestic and international courts, most recently in the context of the populist challenge to judicial authority.

Research

My research interests are in comparative constitutional law, constitutional theory, international law and human rights. I am driven by a genuine curiosity in how legal institutions work in practice, how they affect the real world, and what they can and cannot achieve. Specifically, I analyse the operation of domestic and international courts in their social and political context, often under the frameworks of judicialization of politics and politicization of the judiciary.

While at Queen’s, I will pursue a research project on the clash between the judicialization of politics and executive dominance in the context of the contemporary crisis of constitutional democracy. This project examines judicial responses to executive aggrandizement across countries and contexts, combining comparative constitutional law and political science approaches.  

Publications

Please see my Linkedin profile for the list of my main publications.


Introduction

I grew up in Colindale and attended a state grammar school (St Michael’s Catholic Grammar School). I studied BA French and Russian at UCL (2011-2016), followed by MA Early Modern Studies at UCL under the direction of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (2016-2017).  After a year in non-mainstream teaching, I completed my PhD in French at the University of Cambridge funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (2018-2021). In October 2021, I took up my current position at Queen’s College, Oxford, as a Laming Junior Research Fellow.

Teaching

I offer teaching on French literature and culture including early modern French literature and French cinema.

Research

My research takes a transnational approach to the history and writings of early modern women with a particular focus on early modern French literature and culture. My doctoral thesis explores the London-based salon of the French exile, Hortense Mancini, Duchess of Mazarin. Titled ‘Palace of Exiles’, my thesis draws together the salon’s correspondence, publications, and performances, and traces the salon’s cosmopolitan membership, which spanned French Catholic and Huguenot exiles as well as Anglicans, English Catholics, and Dutch and Italian Protestants. By investigating what happens when the model of the salon moves beyond France’s borders, I argue that the salon transforms into a pan-European space, displacing its French roots in favour of a more diffuse, continental identity. I am currently working to turn this thesis into a monograph. 

My next project, tentatively titled ‘Huguenot Women: Lively Communication and Translation, 1500-1700’, investigates the forms and styles of Huguenot women’s writings – letters, memoirs, translations – and how these writings have reach and impact. I’m especially interested in ‘liveliness’ as a style of communication and translation, and how attention to lively rhetoric can nuance our understanding of agency in the early modern period. In uncovering the global literary legacy of Huguenot women that stretches from France to Britain, Russia, and Canada, I interrogate what it means to be a Huguenot woman within this transnational framework.

Publications

  • ‘Like Mother, like Daughter: Hortense Mancini, Duchesse de Mazarin, and Marie-Charlotte de La Porte-Mazarin, Marquise de Richelieu’, Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal, Volume 16, Issue 1, Fall 2021.
  • ‘An Epicurean Farewell: Saint-Évremond, Lucretius, and the Godolphin Manuscript’, French Studies, Volume 75, Issue 4, October 2021.
  • I am also a committed public historian with several research outputs:
  • ‘Leading Ladies: The French tradition of the royal mistress gave new opportunities for women at the court of Charles II’, History Today, Volume 70, Issue 8, August 2020, pp.42-55.
  • ‘Aphra Behn’, BBC Freethinking: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000qyvg
  • ‘The Rise of the Royal Mistresses’, Cambridge Festival: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6-jqgSpq14 


Introduction

I obtained my BSc in Neurosciences in 2007 and then graduated from Imperial College London in Clinical Medicine in 2009. After finishing my general medical training in London, I was awarded a Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Fellowship in 2014 and completed my DPhil in Clinical Neurosciences at New College, Oxford. I then went on to train in Neurology at Imperial before returning to Oxford to take up my current position as a Clinical Lecturer in Neurology.

I have a strong interest in medical technology and health innovation. I am part of The Academy of Medical Sciences Future Leader in Innovation, Enterprise and Research programme and I was also one of the first NHS Clinical Entrepreneur Fellows at NHS England.

Teaching

I teach fifth- and sixth-year medical students Clinical Neurology. Topics covered include clinical examinations, neurological emergencies, and patient simulation sessions. In addition, I chair student grand round presentations and carry out regular bedside teaching for finals examinations. I also co-supervise MSc and DPhil student research projects.

Research

My research interests are in cognitive neurosciences. My work is currently focused on exploring the mechanism of motivation and memory within neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. I aim to develop novel strategies for detection and risk stratification in dementia using behavioural and physiological assessments. I have a particular interest in patients with early subjective cognitive impairment and developing digital programmes for behaviour change to improve cognitive function.

Publications

Please see https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?hl=en&user=hm1HPWwAAAAJ&view_op=list_works for a full list of publications. 


Introduction

I grew up in Wallonia, the southern French-speaking part of Belgium, where I attended my local state school. In 2009, I moved to Brussels to study Chinese and English for a Translation and Interpreting degree at the Institut Supérieur de Traducteurs et Interprètes (ISTI). My graduate education includes a MA in Translation, and a PhD in Literature and Translation Studies from the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB, 2020). I arrived at Oxford in 2020 as a Wiener-Anspach Postdoctoral Fellow with the Oxford China Centre, before taking up my current position at Queen’s in 2021. In addition to my academic career, I am a published translator of contemporary Sinophone literature into French, with a taste for poetry and short fiction.

Teaching

I have taught a broad range of topics within literary and Chinese studies, including research methods for Chinese studies (ULB, 2018-21), Hong Kong literature, literary translation (Ca’Foscari, 2019), and seminars in translation history (Oxford, Oriental Studies, 2021). I am happy to supervise undergraduate theses in Oriental Studies or History on topics such as modern Chinese Literature, gender, linguistic or translation history (late nineteenth century to the present).

Research

My area of expertise is the history of linguistics and literary translation in the late-Qing and Republican periods, with a special focus on the impact of literary translation on language reform. In particular, my first monograph project explores the intellectual and literary debates surrounding gender equality that rocked the Chinese intellectual and literary scenes after gendered pronouns were introduced into modern vernacular Chinese in the late 1910s. Still firmly rooted in Chinese linguistic history, literature, and gender studies, my next project for the Laming Fellowship will investigate how racialized and gendered linguistic hierarchies were enacted and (re)negotiated in late-Qing and Republican Chinese Literature (ca. 1895-1945) in the wake of the translation of European orientalist literature, and how those processes intersected with the Othering at play in literature portraying South and Southeast Asian peoples, languages, and scripts. Hoping to foster academic networks of solidarities for early career researchers working on gender and China, I am also a co-founder of the China Academic Network on Gender (CHANGE – https://change.hypotheses.org).

Publications

For a complete list of my publications and more information on my research, please visit https://oxford.academia.edu/CoralineJortay.


Introduction

I am from Sestao, a historically industrial city in the area of the Greater Bilbao that we call Ezkerraldea, where I went to high-school prior to starting the undergraduate degree in Physics at the University of the Basque Country. In 2016 I moved to London to study an MSc in Quantum Fields and Fundamental Forces at Imperial College London and a PhD in Theoretical Physics at King’s College London. In October 2021 I joined the Astrophysics sub-department and the Queen’s College as Beecroft Fellow in Cosmology and an extraordinary Junior Research Fellow in Physics.

Teaching

I teach the Symmetry & Relativity (B2) and General Relativity (B5) tutorials to third year physics students at Queen’s. I also supervise master and PhD students in the Astrophysics department.

Research

My area of expertise is numerical relativity, which is the use of high-performance computing methods to solve Einstein’s equations of general relativity to study cosmological and astrophysical phenomena in the most extreme regimes of gravity. In short, I use computers to simulate some of the most catastrophic events in the Universe, such as the collision of black holes!

We are in a new era of gravitational physics in which both gravitational-wave measurements and cosmological observations can be used to test fundamental physics. Moreover, recent computational developments allow us to investigate (at present largely unexplored) regimes where the gravitational force is strong – a very promising area to search for new physics. At Queen’s, I am carrying a novel research program to explore how the gravitational waves that are produced in the most catastrophic events in the Universe can be used to answer some of the greatest outstanding questions in physics: How did the Universe begin? What is it made of?


Introduction

I grew up in Sanremo, in the Ligurian region of Italy, not far from the French border. After studying Medicine and Surgery at the University of Turin (2005-2007), I obtained a BA in Italian Literature from the same university (2010). My graduate education includes an MA in Modern Philology from the University of Pavia (2013), an M.St. in Modern Languages from the University of Oxford (2014), and a DPhil in Medieval and Modern Languages, also from Oxford (2018). Since 2017, I have been a Stipendiary Lecturer in Italian at St Anne’s College, Oxford, and I arrived at Queen’s as a Laming Research Fellow in October 2019. In addition to my academic career, I am a writer and a ballet dancer (London RAD). My first collection of poems, Itaca, has won two international literary prizes.

Teaching

As a tutor at St Anne’s College, I teach Italian literature from the 19th-century to the present, all literary topics for the first-year Italian literature course, and creative writing. Since 2015, I have lectured for the Medieval and Modern Languages Faculty (Leopardi, Manzoni, Verga), and delivered courses in Translation, Finalists’ Essay Writing and Italian Grammar (Pre-Sessional Course). Since 2017 I have been an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. In 2018, I was nominated for the Oxford Student Union Teaching Awards.

Research

My research concentrates on modern and contemporary literature originally written in, or translated into, different languages (English, Italian, French and Spanish) and media (poetry, prose, music and the visual arts). My doctoral thesis – entitled The Diasporic Canon. American Anthologies of Contemporary Italian Poetry, 1945-2015 – analyses the shaping of a translated canon in the United States as an expression of the culture of Italian migration to North America. The project that I shall work on during my Laming Fellowship investigates the interplay at work between translation and medicine, by exploring the therapeutic potential of translation in contemporary English, French and Italian poetry. Over the course of the fellowship, I shall travel to, and collaborate with, research centres based in Italy, Finland, Norway and the United States.

Publications

For a complete list of my publications, please visit: https://martaarnaldi.weebly.com, or http://oxford.academia.edu/MartaArnaldi.


Introduction

I went to school at the local comprehensive (Glossopdale Community College, Glossop, Derbyshire) and then studied Medicine at Imperial College, London where I was awarded the St Mary’s Medical School Entrance Scholarship, the Harry Barkley Prize, and Distinctions. As a junior doctor, I trained at Charing Cross, Chelsea and Westminster, Hammersmith and Royal Brompton Hospital. I had completed three years of Cardiology specialisation on the Bart’s London rotation, when I was awarded a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship to complete a doctorate in Cardiovascular Medicine at Oxford. During my doctorate, I was the Junior Dean at Exeter College, Oxford. I am now a NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer and Specialist Registrar in Cardiology, based at John Radcliffe Hospital.

Teaching

I supervise and teach clinical students during their Special Study Module in Cardiology and provide bedside teaching to junior doctors undertaking postgraduate membership exams. I previously served as a clinical tutor at St Hilda’s College, Oxford. I also co-supervise MSc and DPhil students.

Research

I am interested in using computational approaches in cardiovascular disease to integrate multivariate data from diagnostic electrocardiogram, imaging, blood and genetic tests to improve our understanding of pathophysiology. In my doctoral research, I imaged heart muscle disarray, a microstructural abnormality which underlies sudden cardiac death in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM; the most common inherited heart disease), where no non-invasive in vivo technique exists for patients. I also collaborated with Computer Science, and applied machine learning and computational simulation to integrate the electrocardiogram and imaging to detect subtle electrical changes indicative of such underlying defects. My aim is to create a unified multimodal model of disease to advance our mechanistic understanding, improve patient risk assessment, and guide treatments.


Introduction

I spent the first 15 years of my life in the coastal city of Dar es salaam in Tanzania, followed by a few years in Oman. I moved to the UK to pursue my higher education in 2011. I hold a BSc in Biomedical Sciences with Honours from the University of Kent (2011-2014). I then moved to London to pursue an MSc in Biomedical Sciences at University College London (2014-2015). My interest in ion channel physiology and pharmacology led to a PhD in Pharmacology at UCL (2016-2020). I am now a postdoctoral Fellow on a BBSRC link award between the laboratories of Professor Paolo Tammaro and Fran Platt in the Department of Pharmacology and Autifony Therapeutics.

Teaching

During my doctorate at UCL I held teaching assistant and co-supervisory roles in pharmacology, biochemistry and diseases of ageing modules. I was recognised as an Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in 2019.

Research

My research interests are in ion channel physiology and pharmacology, with particular interest in a novel group of chloride ion channels known as TMEM16A. Unlike other channels, TMEM16A is highly sensitive to its lipid environment, including signalling lipids. Furthermore, their ubiquitous expression in the vasculature poses severe implications for vascular disease (including Niemann-Pick Disease, type C1-disease). Thus, my research aims to elucidate the extent of lipid sensitivity of this channel by lipids and exploit this knowledge to develop lipid-like small molecules with therapeutic potential.