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Introduction

I am currently a PDRA at the Mathematical Institute of the University of Oxford. Before moving to the UK, I spent almost three years as postdoctoral researcher at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany. I received my PhD in Mathematics and Models from the University of L’Aquila, Italy, in 2019. As undergraduate, I studied Mathematics at the University of Naples “Federico II”, in Italy.

Teaching

Since I was a DPhil student I have tutored for courses in Calculus, Functional Analysis, Partial Differential Equations, and Continuum Mechanics, for which I was also co-lecturer, in Italy and Germany. Other than that, I supervised a MSc thesis on a particular application of optimal transport theory to PDEs.

Research

My research focuses on the analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). They represent a fascinating, intriguing, and powerful mathematical tool to interpret, describe, and understand several phenomena, e.g., in biology, particle physics, social sciences, pedestrian dynamics, etc. I am particularly interested in PDEs modelling (nonlocal) interactions, as well as those showing a competition between aggregation and diffusion, also in case of systems — so called cross-diffusion systems. Among other properties, I am fascinated by the connection between micro and macro description, and the generalisation of some PDEs to non-standard ambient spaces, such as graphs or networks.

Publications

Please refer to my personal webpage for the list of my publications.

Introduction

I received my PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Santiago de Compostela in 2016 with a dissertation on the work of Spanish poet José Ángel Valente. Since then, I have taught Spanish language and literature at the University of Liverpool, Durham University, and the University of Sheffield. In 2020, I published a monograph on Valente’s work, Memory and Utopia: The Poetry of José Ángel Valente. My current research explores how the insights of literary memory studies can help us better understand the social and cultural consequences of ecological change.

Introduction

Dr Hankinson studied English at Balliol College, completing his DPhil in 2020 under the supervision of Professor Matthew Reynolds. He has since taught at St Hilda’s College, St Anne’s College, and Jesus College, and worked as the Co-ordinator of the Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation Research Centre (OCCT), based at St Anne’s, where he currently leads a research strand on Comparative African Literatures.

Teaching

To Queen’s English undergraduates I teach both Prelims Paper 3, on nineteenth-century texts and contexts, and Prelims Paper 1b, an introductory paper on literary theory.

Research

Dr Hankinson’s research explores the relations between nationalism, belonging, foreignness, and style, with a particular focus on the period 1860-present. His work routinely involves the tracing of relations which proliferate beyond temporal and geographical boundaries, and the development of innovative comparative methodologies—two activities united in a forthcoming monograph which stages an encounter between the Victorian poet Robert Browning and the contemporary Ghanaian poet and novelist Kojo Laing. 

Publications

Please visit: https://www.josephhankinson.com/articles.


I joined the college in 2019. I am a specialist registrar in Clinical Medicine and Immunology at the John Radcliffe Hospital and am pursuing a DPhil in Clinical Medicine in the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine. I am from Sri Lanka and am a Lecturer in Clinical Medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo. I have a special interest in medical education and have expertise in teaching basic sciences and clinical medicine at the bedside.

I also have a special interest in Medical Humanities and exploring the potential use of music in developing empathy and communication skills among medical students and junior doctors.

Teaching

The transition to learning in the clinical environment can be a daunting task for any medical student. I help students learn the basic principles of clinical medicine, understanding symptoms and signs in medicine and help them learn the clinical processes of diagnosis and management and techniques of developing effective and compassionate clinical care. I also support them to acquire the skills of becoming a successful foundation doctor and provide guidance to choose career pathways to shape their future.


Introduction

I grew up in London before coming up to Oxford to read English at Lady Margaret Hall. After graduating, I moved to Jesus College, Oxford for my Masters in medieval literature and subsequently for my DPhil. I have taught medieval English language and literature, and the English language, at a variety of Oxford colleges since 2008. Most recently, I have been working as a researcher on the EU-funded project CLASP: A Consolidated Library of Anglo-Saxon Poetry located at the English Faculty here in Oxford. 

Teaching

I teach medieval language and literature, covering the period from the earliest written records of English in the seventh century until the reign of Henry VIII in the mid-sixteenth century. My teaching focuses, however, particularly upon the early medieval period. I also teach the history and development of the English language.

Research

My research focuses on Old English literature (roughly anything written in English before the twelfth century). I have particular interests in vernacular poetics, cultural constructions of space and place, and architectural metaphor. I am also peculiarly interested in the conceptualization of prisons in early medieval prose and verse, which is the focus of the book on which I’m currently working.

Publications

  • ‘The Gates of Hell: Invasion and Damnation in an Anonymous Old English Easter Vigil Homily’, in Leeds Studies in English: Special Issue – Architectural Representation in Early Medieval England (forthcoming).
  • Landes to fela: Geography, Topography and Place in The Battle of Maldon’, in English Studies 98:8 (2017), 781–801.
  • ‘Associative Memory and the Composition of Ælfric’s Dominica in Quinquagessima (Catholic Homilies I 10)’, Notes & Queries 64:1 (2017), 5–10.
  • ‘Rewriting Gregory the Great: the Prison Analogy in Napier Homily I’, Review of English Studies 68 (2017), 203–23.
  • ‘Incarceration as Judicial Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England’, in eds. Jay Paul Gates and Nicole Marafioti, Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2014), 92–112.
  • ‘Literal and Spiritual Depths: re-thinking the ‘drygne seað’ of Elene’, Quaestio Insularis 10 (2009), 27–44.

Research

I am interested in control over the interaction between light and matter at the quantum level. I also study materials and devices for quantum optics and optoelectronics, primarily involving defects in diamond and semiconductor quantum dots, as well as applications in quantum communications and computing. Other areas of research include optical microsystems for quantum optics, chemical sensing and spectroscopy.


Introduction

I read Literae Humaniores as an undergraduate at Christ Church, Oxford, where I also took an MSt in ancient philosophy.  I subsequently moved to Oriel College, Oxford, where I completed my DPhil in philosophy and taught as a college lecturer.  I then spent five years as Career Development Fellow in Ancient Philosophy at Balliol College, Oxford, following which, in 2019, I took up my current position at Queen’s.

Teaching

Ancient philosophy.

Research

My research interests are in ancient philosophy, with a focus to date on Hellenistic epistemology and scepticism.

Publications

‘Proof Against Proof: A Reading of Sextus Empiricus’ Against the Logicians 8.463-481’, Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 61 (2022), pp.263-304.

‘The Sceptic’s Art: Varieties of Expertise in Sextus Empiricus’ in Johansen, T. (ed.) Productive Knowledge in Ancient Philosophy: The Concept of Technê, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021), pp.226-244.

Five Modes of Scepticism: Sextus Empiricus and the Agrippan Modes (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019), pp. x + 204.


Introduction

I completed my undergraduate degree in Psychology at Bangor University, where I remained to complete my Masters degree in Psychological Research with Clinical Neuroscience and PhD in Social Neuroscience. I came to Oxford in 2014 as a postdoctoral researcher and was appointed Departmental Lecturer in Experimental Psychology and College Lecturer in Statistics at Queen’s College in October 2017. 

Teaching

I teach statistics for the Experimental Psychology and Psychology, Philosophy and Linguistics courses across Prelims, Part I and Part II. My teaching predominantly covers material from the Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics and Experimental Design and Statistics Courses.  

Research

My research examines how humans navigate social environments focusing on how social information shapes decision-making processes. Specifically, I am interested in understanding how different pieces of social information contribute to decision-making, and the underlying neural processes. For example, how do facial expressions of emotion influence interpersonal and intergroup trust and cooperation? Social partners are a rich source of information and provide many cues, which we can use to guide our decision-making and behaviour. Therefore, my research aims to understand how people perceive, interpret, and use the different social cues they receive in an interaction (e.g. facial expressions of emotion, or behaviours such as the reciprocity of trust). To investigate these ideas I apply reinforcement learning, and neuroeconomic models to social interactions.

Publications

  • Shore, D.M., Ng, R., Bellugi, U., & Mills, D.L. (2017). Abnormalities in early visual processes are linked to hypersociability and atypical evaluation of facial trustworthiness: an ERP study with Williams syndrome. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience. doi:10.3758/s13415-017-0528-6
  • Ha, T., Granger, D. A., Shore, D. M., Yeung, E.W., & Dishion, T.J. (2015). Neural responses to partner rejection predict adrenocortical reactivity in adolescent romantic couples. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 61, 39. doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2015.07.495. 


Introduction

Before coming to Oxford I lectured phonetics for clinical, fieldwork and ELT purposes (UCL and De Montfort University). I am a co-organiser of the biennial Phonetics Teaching and Learning Conference and co-direct the Summer Course in English Phonetics at UCL. I also co-examined for the International Phonetic Association’s Certificate of Proficiency in the Phonetics of English.

Teaching

I teach Prelims Paper IX (Phonetics and Phonology), FHS Paper B/XII (Phonetics) and selected topics for General Linguistics Paper A.

Research

My research interests focus on experimental phonetics. I have been co-investigator on a project ‘Greek in Contact’, which looks at the impact of long-term language contact on the intonational patterns of Greek communities who lived and interacted with Turkish and Italian speaking populations. I am currently working on ‘nasal vowels’ of Polish with a view to establishing their phonemic make-up.

Publications

  • to appear – An overview of phonetics for language teachers. The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary English Pronunciation (Okim Kang, Ron Thomson, John M. Murphy (eds). New York: Routledge.
  • to appear – Baltazani, M., Przedlacka, J., Coleman, J. Greek in contact: a historical-acoustic investigation of Asia Minor Greek intonational patterns. Proceedings of Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory 7. Rethymno, October 2016
  • 2017 – Ashby, M. and Przedlacka, J. Technology and pronunciation teaching, 1890–1940. In McLelland, N. and  Smith, R. (eds) The History of Language Learning and Teaching II: 19th-20th Century Europe. Oxford: Maney: Legenda series.
  • 2014 – Ashby, M. and Przedlacka, J. Measuring incompleteness: acoustic correlates of glottal articulations. Journal of the International Phonetic Association 44 (3). 283-296.
  • 2015 – Przedlacka, J. and Baghai-Ravary, L. Pitch and segment duration in RP: a corpus-based historical exploration. 18th ICPhS Proceedings, Glasgow.
  • 2011 – Ashby, M. and Przedlacka, J. The stops that aren’t. Journal of English Phonetic Society of Japan 14-15.
  • 2005 – Dziubalska-Kołaczyk, K. and Przedlacka, J. (eds.) English Pronunciation Models: A Changing Scene. Linguistic Insights. Studies in Language and Communication 21. Frankfurt:  Peter Lang.
  • 2002 – Estuary English? A sociophonetic study of teenage speech in the Home Counties. Frankfurt: Peter Lang.

Teaching

I teach Lusophone Literature from the nineteenth century to the present day, especially Eça de Queirós; Fernando Pessoa; women writers; the literature of Portuguese-speaking Africa.

Research

My research examines Portuguese and Brazilian literature from the nineteenth century to the present day and twentieth century literature from Portuguese-speaking Africa. My interests include genre and gender, canon-formation; women writers and images of women; Portuguese modernism; the role of literature in colonial and post-colonial representations of the nation.

Publications

  • Editor, with Stephen Parkinson, Reading Literature in Portuguese. Commentaries in Honour of Tom Earle, (Oxford: Legenda, 2013)
  • Antigone’s Daughters? Gender, Genealogy, and the Politics of Authorship in Twentieth-Century Portuguese Women’s Writing, with Hilary Owen (Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 2011)
  • Editor, with Stephen Parkinson and T. F. Earle, A Companion to Portuguese Literature, (Woodbridge: Tamesis, 2009)
  • Editor, with Claire Williams, Closer to the Wild Heart. Essays on Clarice Lispector, (Oxford: Legenda, 2002)
  • Imagens do Eu na Poesia de Florbela Espanca, (Lisbon: Imprensa Nacional- Casa da Moeda, 1997) 
  • Editor, with Glória Fernandes, Women, Literature and Culture in the Portuguese-Speaking World (Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press, 1996)


Introduction

I am a Lecturer in Probability and Statistics at The Queen’s College, Oxford University and a Senior Research Fellow in Modelling Infectious Diseases at The Big Data Institute at University of Oxford. I am also affiliated with The Wolfson Centre of Mathematical Biology at Oxford University.

I was at Queen’s during my undergraduate and graduate studies in Mathematics at Oxford University between 1996 and 2005. I completed my DPhil in computational mathematics under the supervision of Prof Philip Maini and Prof Helen Byrne in 2005. Following academic posts at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and at UCL, in June 2021 I moved to the Big Data Institute at University of Oxford within Christophe Fraser’s Pathogen Dynamics Group and to take up a Lecturer post at Queen’s.

I am a Fellow of The Institute of Mathematics and its ApplicationsThe Royal Statistical Society and The Royal Society for Public Health. I am actively involved in promoting mathematics and statistics as well as other STEM subjects across schools in the UK.

Teaching

At Queen’s I teach a number of applied mathematics modules to first, second- and third-year undergraduates together with option topics in applied statistics and mathematical biology. I also supervise MMATH (fourth year) mathematics undergraduate projects. To date I have supervised three PhD students and 47 MSc and summer projects to completion.

Research

My research combines mathematical and statistical methods with data analysis and numerical simulations to answer existing and emerging questions in infectious disease and public health. I am an experienced mathematical modeller with extensive training in applied mathematics and statistics who delivers ground-breaking, innovative research in infectious disease modelling that is policy relevant, impactful and has methodological rigour. Details of my research and publications can be found on my website.


Introduction

I obtained my BSc in biological and earth sciences at the Université Saint Joseph in Beirut in 2006. Following a brief spell at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, I completed my MSc in applied physiology at the University of Oxford followed by an MPhil in bioenergetics at the University of Cambridge. In 2009, I was awarded a Clarendon scholarship to pursue my DPhil studies in clinical neurology at the University of Oxford. Since 2014, I have held various postdoctoral appointments at Bristol and Oxford. I joined Queen’s in 2017 as stipendiary lecturer in neurophysiology.

Teaching

I have formal pedagogic training (PGCert) and I am a fellow of the higher education academy (FHEA). I teach the neurophysiology syllabus at Queen’s to first-year undergraduates in experimental psychology. I also teach the neuroscience syllabus to second-year undergraduates reading medicine and biomedical science and provide tutorials for the final honour school (FHS part II modules Cell and Systems Biology and FHS part II Neuroscience. I provide supervision for FHS medical students who take an interest in submitting extended essays on neuroimmunology, neurodevelopment and neurodevelopmental disorders as part of the FHS medical sciences’ examination. 

Research

My research is focused on human neurodevelopment and how microglia, the brain’s resident macrophages, participate in shaping the neurodevelopmental landscape in humans. I have recently mapped the spatiotemporal dynamics of microglia in the cortex across the human lifespan from early development until advanced age. With this map, we can now begin to examine how these cells interact with the developing brain environment in humans and investigate how they may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability. My interests span the medical sciences, and this has resulted in multiple successful collaborative papers such as the discovery of a novel hormone in the heart that could be a potential therapeutic target in atrial fibrillation. I collaborate with various groups in the UK and abroad including the Long lab (KCL), the Vernon lab (KCL), the Gomez-Nicola lab (Southampton), the Holcman lab (ENS), the Coutinho lab (Coimbra), the Krsnik lab (Zagreb) and the Tremblay lab (Victoria).

Publications

  • Menassa DA, Muntslag TAO, Martin-Estebané M, Barry-Carroll L, Chapman MA, Adorjan I, Tyler T, Turnbull B, Rose-Zerilli MJJ, Nicoll JAR, Krsnik Z, Kostovic I, Gomez-Nicola D. The spatiotemporal dynamics of microglia across the human lifespan. Dev Cell. 2022 Aug 9: S1534-5807(22)00546-9. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2022.07.015. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35977545.
  • Menassa, D. A., Muntslag, T. A. O., Martin-Estebané, M., Barry-Carroll, L., Chapman, M. A., Adorjan, I., Tyler, T., Turnbull, B., Rose-Zerilli, M. J. J., Nicoll, J. A. R., Krsnik, Z., Kostovic, I., & Gomez-Nicola, D. (2021). Spatiotemporal dynamics of human microglia are linked with brain developmental processes across the lifespan. bioRxiv, 2021.2008.2007.455365. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.08.07.455365.
  • Hu Y, Fryatt GL, Ghorbani M, Obst J, Menassa DA, Martin-Estebane M, Muntslag TAO, Olmos-Alonso A, Guerrero-Carrasco M, Thomas D, Cragg MS, Gomez-Nicola D. Replicative senescence dictates the emergence of disease-associated microglia and contributes to Aβ pathology. Cell Rep. 2021 Jun 8;35(10):109228. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2021.109228. PMID: 34107254; PMCID: PMC8206957.
  • Gundersen JK, Chakkarapani E, Jary S, Menassa DA, Scull-Brown E, Frymoyer A, Walløe L, Thoresen M. Morphine and fentanyl exposure during therapeutic hypothermia does not impair neurodevelopment. The Lancet EClinicalMedicine. 2021 Jun 5;36:100892. doi: 10.1016/j.eclinm.2021.100892. PMID: 34308308; PMCID: PMC8257990.
  • Moreira LM, Takawale A, Hulsurkar M, Menassa DA, Antanaviciute A, Lahiri SK, Mehta N, Evans N, Psarros C, Robinson P, Sparrow AJ, Gillis MA, Ashley N, Naud P, Barallobre-Barreiro J, Theofilatos K, Lee A, Norris M, Clarke MV, Russell PK, Casadei B, Bhattacharya S, Zajac JD, Davey RA, Sirois M, Mead A, Simmons A, Mayr M, Sayeed R, Krasopoulos G, Redwood C, Channon KM, Tardif JC, Wehrens XHT, Nattel S, Reilly S. Paracrine signalling by cardiac calcitonin controls atrial fibrogenesis and arrhythmia. Nature. 2020 Nov 4. doi: 10.1038/s41586-020-2890-8. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33149301.
  • Carroll L, Braeutigam S, Dawes JM, Krsnik Z, Kostovic I, Coutinho E, Dewing JM, Horton CA, Gomez-Nicola D, Menassa DA. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Multiple Routes to, and Multiple Consequences of, Abnormal Synaptic Function and Connectivity. Neuroscientist. 2020 May 22:1073858420921378. doi: 10.1177/1073858420921378. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 32441222.
  • Pollak TA, Kempton MJ, Iyegbe C, Vincent A, Irani SR, Coutinho E, Menassa DA, Jacobson L, de Haan L, Ruhrmann S, Sachs G, Riecher-Rössler A, Krebs MO, Amminger P, Glenthøj B, Barrantes-Vidal N, van Os J, Rutten BPF, Bressan RA, van der Gaag M, Yolken R, Hotopf M, Valmaggia L, Stone J, David AS; EUGEI High-Risk Study, McGuire P. Clinical, cognitive and neuroanatomical associations of serum NMDAR autoantibodies in people at clinical high risk for psychosis. Mol Psychiatry. 2020 Oct 19. doi: 10.1038/s41380-020-00899-w. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33077853.
  • Phillips T, Menassa DA, Grant S, Cohen N, Thoresen M. The effects of Xenon gas inhalation on neuropathology in a placental-induced brain injury model in neonates: A pilot study. Acta Paediatr. 2020 Jul 18. doi: 10.1111/apa.15486. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 32681542.
  • Berridge G, Menassa DA, Moloney T, Waters PJ, Welding I, Thomsen S, Zuberi S, Fischer R, Aricescu AR, Pike M, Dale RC, Kessler B, Vincent A, Lim M, Irani SR, Lang B. Glutamate receptor δ2 serum antibodies in pediatric opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome. Neurology. 2018 Aug 21;91(8):e714-e723. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000006035. Epub 2018 Jul 25. PubMed PMID: 30045961; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6107266.
  • Menassa DA, Gomez-Nicola D. Microglial Dynamics During Human Brain Development. Front Immunol. 2018 May 24;9:1014. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2018.01014. eCollection 2018. Review. PubMed PMID: 29881376; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5976733.
  • Dawes JM, Weir G, Middleton SJ, Patel R, Chisholm K, Pettingill P, Peck LJ, Sheridan J, Shakir A, Jacobson L, Gutierrez-Mecinas M, Galino J, Walcher J, Kuhnemund J, Kuehn H, Sanna M, Lang B, Clark AJ, Themistocleous A, Iwagaki N, West SJ, Werynksa K, Carroll L, Trendafilova T, Menassa DA, Giannoccaro MP, Coutinho E, Cervellini I, Tewari D, Buckley C, Leite M, Wildner H, Zeilhofer HU, Peles E, Todd AJ, McMahon SB, Dickenson LH, Lewin G, Vincent A, Bennett DLH (2018). Immune or genetic mediated disruption of CASPR2 causes pain hypersensitivity due to enhanced primary afferent excitability. Neuron, e1-e10. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2018.01.033
  • Menassa DA, Braeutigam S, Bailey A, Falter-Wagner CM. Frontal evoked γ-activity modulates behavioural performance in Autism Spectrum Disorders in a perceptual simultaneity task. Neurosci Lett. 2018 Feb 5; 665:86-91. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2017.11.045. Epub 2017 Nov 27. PubMed PMID: 29191694.
  • Phillips TJ, Scott H, Menassa DA, Bignell AL, Sood A, Morton JS, Akagi T, Azuma K, Rogers MF, Gilmore CE, Inman GJ, Grant S, Chung Y, Aljunaidy MM, Cooke CL, Steinkraus BR, Pocklington A, Logan A, Collett GP, Kemp H, Holmans PA, Murphy MP, Fulga TA, Coney AM, Akashi M, Davidge ST, Case CP. Treating the placenta to prevent adverse effects of gestational hypoxia on fetal brain development. Sci Rep. 2017 Aug 22;7(1):9079. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-06300-1. PubMed PMID: 28831049; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5567270.
  • Coutinho E, Menassa DA, Jacobson L, West S, Domingos J, Moloney T, Pedersen MG, Benros, ME, Lang B, Bennett DLH, Harrison PJ, Mortensen PB, Nørgaard-Pedersen B, Bannerman D, Vincent A (2017). Maternal CASPR2 antibodies and neurodevelopmental disorders in the offspring: epidemiological findings and an animal model. The Lancet, 389(S1), S18. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30414-2
  • Menassa DA, Sloan C, Chance SA. Primary olfactory cortex in autism and epilepsy: increased glial cells in autism. Brain Pathol. 2017 Jul;27(4):437-448. doi: 10.1111/bpa.12415. Epub 2016 Aug 15. PubMed PMID: 27409070.
  • Levett DZ, Radford EJ, Menassa DA, Graber EF, Morash AJ, Hoppeler H, Clarke K, Martin DS, Ferguson-Smith AC, Montgomery HE, Grocott MP, Murray AJ; Caudwell Xtreme Everest Research Group. Acclimatization of skeletal muscle mitochondria to high-altitude hypoxia during an ascent of Everest. FASEB J. 2012 Apr;26(4):1431-41. doi: 10.1096/fj.11-197772. Epub 2011 Dec 20. PubMed PMID: 22186874. 
  • Roberts LD, Murray AJ, Menassa D, Ashmore T, Nicholls AW, Griffin JL. The contrasting roles of PPARδ and PPARγ in regulating the metabolic switch between oxidation and storage of fats in white adipose tissue. Genome Biol. 2011 Aug 11;12(8):R75. doi: 10.1186/gb-2011-12-8-r75. PubMed PMID: 21843327; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3245615.

At The Queen’s College, I teach first, second and fourth year undergraduates preparing them for their Preliminary examinations (Paper I) and Final Honour School Examinations (Paper I and Paper IIB).

I am also a College Lecturer at Trinity College and St Edmund Hall and a Language Tutor at the University Language Centre.