Viewing archives for Senior Research Fellows

Introduction

I grew up in Devon, went to school in Bedford, and studied Classics with Akkadian as an undergraduate at the University of Birmingham. I stayed on as a doctoral student in Ancient History and Archaeology (Assyriology) and then as a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow. I spent three years in Finland as a State Archives of Assyria Editor at the University of Helsinki. After teaching at UK universities for three years, I moved to Oxford as a Departmental Lecturer in the Faculty. I was then appointed to the part-time Shillito Fellowship in Assyriology in 2006, alongside a Tutorial Fellowship at St Benet’s Hall (2007-22). I was awarded the title of Associate Professor in 2021 and joined Queen’s as a Senior Research Fellow in 2022.  

Teaching

I teach for the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies and give language and text classes in Akkadian and lecture on ancient Middle Eastern religion and literature. As well as teaching small groups of undergraduates and Master’s students across the colleges, I also supervise Master’s and DPhil students.

Research

My broad research interests are in the religion, literature, and intellectual history of ancient Mesopotamia, an area approximately corresponding to modern-day Iraq. Most of the textual sources are written in Akkadian cuneiform on clay tablets from the first millennium BCE. I am particularly interested in cuneiform knowledge production, ritual, and astral mythology in Babylon in the later first millennium BCE, with a focus on the changing fortunes of the Esagil temple under a succession of externally imposed empires. A related research focus is Akkadian literature, including narrative poetry, and its cultural contexts and cuneiform reception over time. My research is closely linked to my teaching and seeks to understand texts and their impact in their ancient cultural settings. 

Publications

List of publications.


Introduction

Dan Sarooshi is Senior Research Fellow of the Queen’s College, Oxford and Professor of Public International Law, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford. He is also co-General Editor of the Oxford Monographs in International Law Series; was appointed by the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2006 to the WTO Dispute Settlement List of Panellists after joint nomination by the United Kingdom Government and the European Communities; and was elected in 2008 to membership of the Executive Council of the American Society of International Law.

Teaching

Public International Law (FHS); International Economic Law (BCL/MJur); International Dispute Settlement (BCL/MJur)

Research

Professor Sarooshi’s books include International Organizations and Their Exercise of Sovereign Powers  (OUP, 2005), The UN and the Development of Collective Security (OUP, 1999), the sole edited Responsibility and Remedies for the Actions of International Organizations (Martinus Nijhoff, Hague Academy of International Law Imprint) (2015), and the co-edited State Responsibility Before International Judicial Institutions  (Hart, 2004). The first two of these books were awarded the 2000 (biennial) Guggenheim Prize by the Guggenheim Foundation in Switzerland; the 2001 American Society of International Law Book Prize; the 2006 Myres S. McDougal Prize awarded by the American Society for the Policy Sciences; and the 2006 American Society of International Law Book Prize.

He has co-authored over 50 academic pieces, including the long chapter with Judge Dame Rosalyn Higgins FBA, QC, former President of the International Court of Justice, and Dr P. Webb, entitled “Institutional Modes of Conflict Management” in National Security Law  (2015, 3rd edn) (125 pp.).


Research

My main research interests are in epistemology and metaphysics, philosophy of mind and action, philosophy of art, and the philosophy of Wittgenstein. In my most recent book, Action, Knowledge, and Will, I argue that human behaviour has four irreducibly different dimensions—physical, psychological, intellectual, and ethical—which were amalgamated or confused in the traditional idea of a ‘will’. My work in philosophy of art has focused mainly on the visual arts. My book The Objective Eye is about the nature of colours and shapes, their representation in pictorial art, and the concept of realism in art theory. I have also written about art and neuroscience.

Publications

Links to some of my recent publications:


Introduction

I was both an undergraduate and a postgraduate student at the University of York, where I obtained an MMath and a PhD. Upon completion of the latter, I went to Portugal to take up a two-year research post at the Centro de Álgebra da Universidade de Lisboa. A further brief research position followed at the University of Manchester, after which I moved to Oxford in early 2010. Since then, I have held a range of different college and departmental positions within Oxford (including the Clifford Norton Studentship at Queen’s, 2011-2013). I returned to Queen’s in October 2015.

Teaching

My teaching in Queen’s covers half of the first- and second-year pure mathematics modules. In the Mathematical Institute, where I am Departmental Lecturer in Mathematics and its History, I am responsible for the third-year course on the history of mathematics.

Research

My background is in mathematics, and I began my research career with problems in abstract algebra. However, I have since moved over into the history of mathematics, where I research a range of topics from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. My interests include the development of abstract algebra, the growth of Soviet mathematics, issues connected with scientific communication, and the modern historiography of ancient mathematics.

Publications

For a list of publications, please see Christopher’s page on the Mathematical Institute website.