Viewing archives for Mathematics and Joint Schools

Introduction

I am currently a PDRA at the Mathematical Institute of the University of Oxford. Before moving to the UK, I spent almost three years as postdoctoral researcher at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany. I received my PhD in Mathematics and Models from the University of L’Aquila, Italy, in 2019. As undergraduate, I studied Mathematics at the University of Naples “Federico II”, in Italy.

Teaching

Since I was a DPhil student I have tutored for courses in Calculus, Functional Analysis, Partial Differential Equations, and Continuum Mechanics, for which I was also co-lecturer, in Italy and Germany. Other than that, I supervised a MSc thesis on a particular application of optimal transport theory to PDEs.

Research

My research focuses on the analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). They represent a fascinating, intriguing, and powerful mathematical tool to interpret, describe, and understand several phenomena, e.g., in biology, particle physics, social sciences, pedestrian dynamics, etc. I am particularly interested in PDEs modelling (nonlocal) interactions, as well as those showing a competition between aggregation and diffusion, also in case of systems — so called cross-diffusion systems. Among other properties, I am fascinated by the connection between micro and macro description, and the generalisation of some PDEs to non-standard ambient spaces, such as graphs or networks.

Publications

Please refer to my personal webpage for the list of my publications.

Courses

  • BA Mathematics
  • MMath Mathematics
  • BA Mathematics and Philosophy
  • MMath Mathematics and Philosophy
  • BA Mathematics and Statistics
  • MMath Mathematics and Statistics

Admissions

The best preparation for the Oxford course is to study Mathematics and Further Mathematics at GCE A-level or the equivalent in Scottish, European, or other qualifications. Nevertheless many mathematicians without Further Maths or equivalent have, with diligence, found it perfectly possible to catch up and have achieved good honours degrees in these courses. The College has a strong tradition in Mathematics. We currently admit 7–8 students each year.

The courses

The courses last four years for an MMath and three years for a BA. Apart from the single subject courses we welcome at Queen’s applications for the joint courses in Mathematics & Philosophy and in Mathematics & Statistics.

Teaching

Normally undergraduates have three or four tutorials each week. The pattern varies in the second, third and fourth years at the point where students choose their options. Thanks to the broad range of interests of the Tutorial Fellows, most of the first- and second-year material is taught by Fellows and Lecturers within the College. The third-year and fourth-year material is taught in the Mathematical Institute in intercollegiate classes, for all colleges.

Admissions Tests

Admissions for Mathematics and Joint Schools is a two-stage process. Candidates take a 2.5 hour test with questions taken from a syllabus roughly corresponding to A-level Maths. Performance in the test is a major factor in the decision on which students to call for interview. We strongly advise you to practise using past papers, which can be found on the Maths Admissions Test page on the Mathematical Institute website. 

Interviews

Usually students are given two interviews at Queen’s and one interview at their second-choice college. Students applying for Maths and Philosophy are given an interview in Philosophy as well. We are looking for candidates who have a good understanding of A-level Mathematics, enjoy Mathematics and are determined to work hard to face the challenge of the course in Oxford. Even though no special preparation is required for the interviews it is worth pointing out that candidates could benefit from the UKMT mentoring scheme to expand their knowledge and experience in Mathematics.


Introduction

I am a Lecturer in Probability and Statistics at The Queen’s College, Oxford University and a Senior Research Fellow in Modelling Infectious Diseases at The Big Data Institute at University of Oxford. I am also affiliated with The Wolfson Centre of Mathematical Biology at Oxford University.

I was at Queen’s during my undergraduate and graduate studies in Mathematics at Oxford University between 1996 and 2005. I completed my DPhil in computational mathematics under the supervision of Prof Philip Maini and Prof Helen Byrne in 2005. Following academic posts at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and at UCL, in June 2021 I moved to the Big Data Institute at University of Oxford within Christophe Fraser’s Pathogen Dynamics Group and to take up a Lecturer post at Queen’s.

I am a Fellow of The Institute of Mathematics and its ApplicationsThe Royal Statistical Society and The Royal Society for Public Health. I am actively involved in promoting mathematics and statistics as well as other STEM subjects across schools in the UK.

Teaching

At Queen’s I teach a number of applied mathematics modules to first, second- and third-year undergraduates together with option topics in applied statistics and mathematical biology. I also supervise MMATH (fourth year) mathematics undergraduate projects. To date I have supervised three PhD students and 47 MSc and summer projects to completion.

Research

My research combines mathematical and statistical methods with data analysis and numerical simulations to answer existing and emerging questions in infectious disease and public health. I am an experienced mathematical modeller with extensive training in applied mathematics and statistics who delivers ground-breaking, innovative research in infectious disease modelling that is policy relevant, impactful and has methodological rigour. Details of my research and publications can be found on my website.


Introduction

Since July 2021, I have held an EPSRC Early Career Fellowship in the Mathematical Institute at Oxford.  I was previously a Titchmarsh Research Fellow at Oxford, and an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences in Leipzig, Germany.  I received my PhD from the University of Chicago in 2015.

Teaching

At Oxford, I have taught classes in areas of analysis and probability.  I have twice been the primary lecturer for the Mathematical Institute’s course on stochastic differential equations, and I have tutored for courses covering topics in mathematical modeling for finance and biology, martingales, and complex analysis and metric spaces.  Prior to joining Queen’s College, I was a College Lecturer at Keble College.

Research

My research is in stochastic analysis, and relies on a wide range of techniques from the theories of partial differential equations and stochastic processes.  This includes, in particular, the study of random environments and stochastic homogenization, stochastic partial differential equations, and randomized algorithms in machine learning.


Introduction

I was both an undergraduate and a postgraduate student at the University of York, where I obtained an MMath and a PhD. Upon completion of the latter, I went to Portugal to take up a two-year research post at the Centro de Álgebra da Universidade de Lisboa. A further brief research position followed at the University of Manchester, after which I moved to Oxford in early 2010. Since then, I have held a range of different college and departmental positions within Oxford (including the Clifford Norton Studentship at Queen’s, 2011-2013). I returned to Queen’s in October 2015.

Teaching

My teaching in Queen’s covers half of the first- and second-year pure mathematics modules. In the Mathematical Institute, where I am Departmental Lecturer in Mathematics and its History, I am responsible for the third-year course on the history of mathematics.

Research

My background is in mathematics, and I began my research career with problems in abstract algebra. However, I have since moved over into the history of mathematics, where I research a range of topics from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. My interests include the development of abstract algebra, the growth of Soviet mathematics, issues connected with scientific communication, and the modern historiography of ancient mathematics.

Publications

For a list of publications, please see Christopher’s page on the Mathematical Institute website.

Introduction

I received my BA in Mathematics from the University of Crete and my PhD from Columbia University in New York. After that I held positions at the University of Warwick, at the University of Paris-Sud and at the University of Athens. I came to Queen’s in 2009.

Teaching

I teach pure mathematics to first and second year students at Queen’s. I usually teach Linear Algebra and Groups, Fields and Rings to first year students and Group Theory, Fields, Number Theory and Multivariable Calculus to second year students.

Research

I started my research studying Group actions on Trees. I moved on to Geometric Group Theory a relatively new approach to infinite groups whereby one treats groups as geometric objects. This led me to questions related to topology and geometry. Some specific topics that I studied are JSJ-decompositions of groups, isoperimetric inequalities both for groups and spaces and non-positively curved groups.

Publications

  • Splittings and the asymptotic topology of the lamplighter group, Trans. AMS, vol. 364, p. 3861- 3873 (2012)
  • Codimension one subgroups and boundaries of hyperbolic groups, with T. Delzant. Groups, Geometry and Dynamics, vol. 4, issue 3, p. 533-548 (2010)
  • Boundaries and JSJ decompositions of CAT(0) groups, with E. Swenson. GAFA, Volume 19, Number 2 , p.558-590 (2009)
  • Cheeger constants of surfaces and isoperimetric inequalities, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 361 (2009), p. 5139-5162.
  • JSJ decompositions and complexes of groups with K.Fujiwara, GAFA v.16, n.1, p.70-125 (2006).
  • Quasi-isometry invariance of group splittings, Annals of Math. v.161, n. 2, p.759{830 (2005).

Introduction

I went to Moorside High School, a comprehensive school in Swinton, near Manchester, and then, for Sixth Form, to Eccles College.  I was an undergraduate student here in Oxford, at New College, where I read Physics.  I did my PhD at the University of Bristol, in Theoretical Physics, advised by Professor Sir Michael Berry FRS.  I held a Lectureship at the University of Manchester before moving to the University of Bristol, where I became the Henry Overton Will Professor of Mathematics.  I was, at various times, the Head of the School of Mathematics and the Dean of Science in Bristol.  I was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2009.  I moved to Oxford to take up the Sedleian Chair in 2019.

Research

I do research in Mathematical Physics, mainly in Quantum Chaos and Random Matrix Theory, and have a particular interest in connections between these areas and Number Theory.  I am generally interested in all areas of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.

Publications

For a list of my recent publications, see https://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/people/jon.keating

Introduction

I went to school at Colegio Maristas La Inmaculada in Granada (Spain) and then studied for both my undergraduate and doctoral degrees in Mathematics at the Universidad de Granada (Spain). I held assistant and associate professor positions at the Universidad de Granada 1992-1998 and 2000-2003. My postdoctoral years were at the University of Texas at Austin (USA) where I taught part-time as lecturer during 1998-2000. My first professorial position was as an ICREA Research Professorship at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain) during the period 2003-2012. Before joining Queen’s in April 2020, I was a Chair in Applied and Numerical Analysis at Imperial College London from 2012 to 2020.

Teaching

I teach the entire breadth of the core courses in applied mathematics at Queen’s, together with option topics in Calculus of Variations and Manifolds. I also typically supervise three or four graduate (DPhil) students and two or three post-doctoral researchers. I will be teaching a Part C course at the Mathematical Institute on advanced material in Optimal Transport and applications to Partial Differential Equations.

Research

My research field is Partial Differential Equations (PDE). They constitute the basic language in which most of the laws in physics or engineering can be written and one of the most important mathematical tools for modelling in life and socio-economical sciences. The modelling based on PDEs, their mathematical analysis, the numerical schemes, and their simulation in applications are my general topics of research. My expertise comprises long-time asymptotics, qualitative properties and numerical schemes for nonlinear diffusion, hydrodynamic, and kinetic equations in the modelling of collective behavior of many-body systems such as gas molecules in rarefied gases, sand beads in granular media, charge particle transport in semiconductors, synchronization of neurons in computational neuroscience or cell movement by chemotaxis or adhesion forces. I was awarded an ERC Advanced Grant in 2020 for funding my research in related topics.

The video below is of an online talk aimed at a non-specialist audience given by José for the Queen’s College Symposium in November, 2020 entitled: ‘Aggregation-Diffusion and Kinetic PDEs for collective behaviour: applications in the sciences’.

Publications

Please see José’s profile page on the Mathematical Institute website for a list of his publications.