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Introduction

I grew up in Eggersriet, Switzerland. In 2013, I obtained my BA in Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Oxford University (Lincoln College). After stints as a journalist, a researcher at the Swiss National Bank, an analyst at a development NGO, and a teacher in a refugee reception centre in Switzerland, I read for an MSc in Economics at the London School of Economics (LSE), where I subsequently stayed for an additional year as a pre-doctoral research fellow.  I completed my PhD in Economics at UC Berkeley in spring 2022 and returned to Oxford as an Associate Professor of Economics at the Economics Department and a Tutorial Fellow at Queen’s College later that year.

Teaching

I teach tutorials in Probability and Statistics and Quantitative Economics at Queen’s. At the Economics Department, I am involved in teaching the undergraduate options course in Development Economics, and I also lecture as part of the MSc in Economics for Development. In addition, I supervise a few MPhil and DPhil students each year.

Research

I conduct empirical research on migration, networks, and spatial linkages between economic agents. For instance, one of my current projects investigates to what extent co-national social networks help newly arriving refugees integrate in the local labor market and society more broadly, and how this affects local firms, workers, and politics. In another, I study how unconditional cash transfers to rural households in Kenya shape their social and economic interactions, and how the benefits of cash ripple through existing social networks within their villages.

Introduction

I studied German and French in Oxford at Magdalen College, where I also began my graduate work on the underground poetry of the former East Germany before getting a two-year fellowship from the FvS Foundation to Germany. I returned to a Fellowship in German at Emmanuel College in Cambridge (1990) but came over to Oxford to a Fellowship at New College in 1993. I was there, as a Tutorial fellow, for almost 30 years, from 2008 as Professor of Modern German Literature before joining Queen’s as the Schwarz-Taylor Chair in October 2022.  

Teaching

I have for a long time taught across the modern German syllabus with a special interest in poetry and the contemporary. My focus will now be graduate teaching: for those with an interest in modern or contemporary literature, East German literature, the Berlin Republic, poetry, translation, spectres, angels, ecology, Brecht and Rilke.

Research

I started my academic life researching the samizdat poetry, art and music scene that existed in East Germany before the fall of the Berlin Wall.  I have continued my interest in the GDR and have published widely on modern German culture, especially of the post-1945 and contemporary periods; my interests range from poetry and the poetic tradition to modernity, GDR literature; contemporary German culture, lateness, afterness, women’s writing, angels, spectres, translation, Rilke and Brecht. Since 2014 I have also led the project Mediating Modern Poetry. I am also a prize-winning translator of contemporary German literature, including Evelyn Schlag, Raoul Schrott, Michael Krüger, Durs Grünbein, Volker Braun and Ulrike Almut Sandig. I think of myself very much as a practitioner alongside my academic work and have taught poetry writing and translation and been awarded artist residences in UK and Germany.

Publications

Recent publications include:

Ulrike Almut Sandig, Monsters Like Us, trans. by Karen Leeder (London, New York, Calcutta: Seagull Books, 2022).

Karen Leeder, ed. (with Lyn Marven), Ulrike Draesner: A Companion (New York, Berlin: de Gruyter, 2022).

Volker Braun, Great Fugue, trans. by Karen Leeder and David Constantine (Ripon: Smokestack Books, 2022).

Via Lewandowsky & Durs Grünbein, Intercom: Dialogue, trans. by Karen Leeder (Göttingen: Steidl, 2022).


Introduction

During my undergraduate studies at Union College, I spent a term in France, where I returned to teach after completing my degree. After a Master’s at Ohio State, I did my PhD at Brown, focusing on nineteenth-century French poetry. I came to Queen’s in 2016.

Following my education in non-selective state schools in the U.S., I pursued undergraduate and postgraduate study and taught at both private and public institutions before coming to Oxford. I welcome applications from excellent students from all corners of the globe and from all walks of life. I also share the University’s commitment to an inclusive environment, which ‘promotes equality, values diversity and maintains a working, learning and social environment in which the rights and dignity of all its staff and students are respected.’

Teaching

I teach French language and literature to all years of the French undergraduate course at Queen’s. In addition to translation from French into English and first-year grammar classes, I teach a range of topics of nineteenth- and twentieth-century French literature. I’m happy to supervise graduate work on nineteenth-century French literature, particularly in poetry.

Research

Much of my research has focused on 19th century poetry: specifically, at the intersection of poetic form and underlying tensions within and around a text. I have tended to work on poets of the second half of the century, including Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, and Krysinska, in my research and in translations as well. I have been the editor of the scholarly journal Nineteenth-Century French Studies since 2014.

Publications

You can find out more about my current research projects, and a list of selected publications, on my Faculty webpage.


Introduction

I attended my local state grammar school (King Edward VI, Chelmsford) and then studied for both my undergraduate and doctoral degrees in engineering at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge. I then spent four years as a research fellow at St. John’s College, Cambridge which included two years in the USA as a Marie Skłodowska Curie fellow at Lawrence Berkley national laboratory. Following this I then spent a brief period as a Diamond-Manchester research fellow within the school of chemistry at the University of Manchester but based at Diamond Light Source on the Harwell campus. In 2019, I took up my current position at Queen’s and the materials department in Oxford.

Teaching

I teach subjects from across the materials course to first, and second-year undergraduates at Queen’s and Mansfield. I also currently supervise two graduate (DPhil) students and two post-doctoral researchers.

Research

My research interests lie primarily in the area of interface science – that is understanding the reactions occurring at the interfaces between materials and their environment. Much of my group’s work involves the development of novel interface sensitive characterisation techniques and using these to understand both desirable and unwanted reactions that occur at the interfaces between functional materials during operation. This includes electrode-electrolyte interfaces in rechargeable batteries, the surfaces of heterogeneous catalyst materials in gas and liquid environments, and two-dimensional materials growing on top of flat substrates.

Publications

For a full list of publications, please visit: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=DLUsdFkAAAAJ&hl=en.


Introduction

I was educated at my local comprehensive school from 11 to 16 and attended a private school for sixth form. I obtained my first degree from Cambridge and a PhD from Imperial, London where I then spent a further three years as a junior researcher. I then studied for a postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE) and spent three years teaching in a large state secondary school in London. Following this I moved to Zurich where I spent 10 years running a small research group. In 2013 I returned to the UK to take up my current position in Oxford. 

Teaching

I am passionate about teaching. In contrast to many colleges, I give most of the first-year tutorials to the Queen’s students myself. These involve the standard essay writing and discussion but also additional activities centred on my extensive natural history collection! I give quantitative methods (QM) tutorials to the second years and prepare the third years for both the general and the data interpretation papers.

Research

I am an ecologist with a particular focus on plants. I have engaged with a broad range of topics, but at the moment I am particularly interested in how plant species coexist and in the symbiotic relationships between algae and other organisms. These relationships allow many other organisms, apart from plants, to take advantage of photosynthesis. I have several DPhil students in my research group working on a diverse range of topics. In addition, I usually supervise a small number of undergraduate projects.

Publications

  • Is ‘Peak N’ key to understanding the timing of flowering in annual plants, New Phytologist (205) 2015, 918-927
  • Land-use intensity and the effects of organic farming on biodiversity: a hierarchical meta-analysis, Journal of Applied Ecology (51) 2014, 746-755
  • Ecology’s dark matter: the elusive and enigmatic niche, Basic and Applied Ecology (15) 2014, 93-100
  • Coexistence, niches, and the effects of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning, Ecology Letters (16) 2013, 116-127
  • Identification of 100 fundamental ecological questions, Journal of Ecology (101) 2013, 58-67
  • Natural enemies drive geographic variation in plant defenses, Science (338) 2012 116-119
  • Adaptation and extinction in experimentally fragmented landscapes, PNAS (107) 2010, 19120-19125


I was educated at local state schools as a child and then at Selwyn College, Cambridge, as an undergraduate and the University of Bristol as a postgraduate. I joined Queen’s in 2006 and worked in the Old Members’ Office for eight years, initially as Old Members’ Officer and then as Director of Development. I was appointed Bursar in 2014.

The role of the Bursar is specified in the Statutes as being ‘responsible for the administration of the property and pecuniary affairs of the College under the authority of the Provost’. Nowadays this roughly corresponds to the role of Chief Financial Officer, and the most important requirement of my post is to oversee the management of the College’s finances, including our endowment investments. However, the role of the Bursar also now includes a certain amount of responsibility for all of the non-academic operations of the College.


Introduction

I am one of the two physics tutors at The Queen’s College. After completing my DPhil at Hertford College in 1983 I was elected to a Junior Research Fellowship at St. John’s College here in Oxford. In 1986 I was elected to a Royal Society University Research Fellowship, which I held until 1990, when I was elected to a Fellowship at Queen’s, and to a University Lectureship at the Department of Physics. I was awarded the title of Professor of Condensed Matter Physics in 2008. I was Head of Condensed Matter Physics from September 2017 until September 2022.  I am the Entertainment Secretary and Wine Steward here at Queen’s. Physics is part of the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division, and I was Associate Head of this Division from October 2011 until September 2016, in charge of academic matters.

Teaching

At Queen’s I teach a range of topics to the undergraduate physics students, including electromagnetism and optics, thermal physics and condensed matter physics.

Research

I am interested in the optical properties of materials, and have been working in the areas of nanotechnology , nanophotonics and quantum computing for the past 10 years. Full details of my research can be found at my departmental web page.

Publications

Some of my recent publications include:


Introduction

I graduated from the University of Genoa, Italy, with a laurea in Biological Sciences (1999). I then specialised in biophysics at the National Research Council in Genoa and went on to earn a PhD in Pharmacology at the University of Bath (2004). I held a post-doctoral fellowship in physiology at Oxford (2004-2008), under the mentorship of Professor Frances Ashcroft, while I was also a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College. In 2008, I was appointed as a Research Council (RCUK) Fellow to set up an independent lab at the University of Manchester. I returned to Oxford in 2012 as an Associate Professor in Pharmacology and a Fellow at Queen’s.

Teaching

I teach undergraduate students at all stages of preclinical medicine and biomedical sciences. My teaching focuses especially on systems and molecular physiology, pharmacology and biophysics. I also teach as part of the MSc course in pharmacology, and I typically supervise three DPhil students in my lab.

Research

The focus of my research is on vascular ion channels, proteins that form microscopic gated pores and thus allow ions to move into and out of cells. In so doing, ion channels give rise to electrical impulses that trigger and control a vast array of fundamental biological processes. Specifically, the cells forming the wall of arteries possess channels that generate signals determining the artery diameter; this ultimately contributes to the control of blood pressure. We aim to understand the way these channels open and close and how alterations in these important proteins may lead to human disease. We also work to identify new ion channel-interacting drugs, which could modulate blood vessel function for therapeutic benefit. To achieve these aims the lab takes a multidisciplinary approach involving studies at the level of molecules, cells, tissues and the whole organism, using a combination of experimental and theoretical methodologies.

Publications

For a full list of publications, please visit https://pharm.ox.ac.uk/team/paolo-tammaro.


Introduction

I was educated at a state school in Norfolk. I studied medicine at Oxford and I undertook my doctoral studies in Physiology by taking three years out in the middle of the medical course – a practice that was more common then than it is now. After qualifying in medicine, I undertook hospital jobs for a period of time in Gloucester and Oxford before taking up my Fellowship at Queen’s.

Teaching

I have taught physiology, with a particular focus on integrative, human and medical physiology, for over 30 years. Although I no longer tutor, I continue to both lecture and examine, and I particularly enjoy giving the first year lecture course on respiratory physiology.

Research

My research interests have focussed around oxygen – not just the way it is used in metabolism, but also the way in which it affects so many of our biological functions, including respiratory, cardiovascular, and metabolic control. Most recently, I have become interested in whether it is possible to characterise clinically useful features of an individual’s physiology using highly precise measures of gas exchange. The idea is that the measurements could be used to direct therapy in relation to a number of respiratory diseases, just as blood pressure measurements are currently used to prescribe antihypertensive drugs. I currently co-direct the Respiratory Theme of the Oxford Biomedical Research Centre with Prof Ian Pavord. My personal research is currently supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and by GSK.

Publications

For a full list of publications, see my Google Scholar page.

Selected publications


Introduction

My undergraduate studies in Music were at Cambridge, where I held an Organ Scholarship. After this, I pursued doctoral research in Portugal, and then moved to Oxford as Lecturer at St Peter’s College and St Edmund Hall. I then spent six years teaching at the University of Surrey, before taking up my post at Queen’s in 1997. As Organist at Queen’s I direct the Chapel Choir, and work with the Organ Scholars in planning the choir’s activities, including thrice-weekly services in term-time, concerts, tours, recordings, and broadcasts. I also organise (with the assistance of the Organ Scholars) a series of weekly organ recitals in term-time on the College’s fine Frobenius organ.

Teaching

My tutorial teaching covers many aspects of the Oxford undergraduate course, including music history from the Middle Ages to the end of the Baroque, and techniques of composition. I supervise postgraduate students in areas related to my own research. I also lecture at the Faculty of Music, particularly in my research field of Renaissance vocal music, and in choral conducting.

Research

My research focuses on sacred music in Spain, Portugal, and England during the Renaissance. I have written about the music of William Byrd, and many of the greatest Spanish and Portuguese composers of the period. As a conductor, I direct the Chapel Choir at Queen’s, as well as the professional vocal consort Contrapunctus. My conducting work has several times been nominated for the Gramophone early-music award, and I tour extensively in Europe and beyond with the groups I direct.

Publications

  • The Requiem of Tomás Luis de Victoria (1603) (Cambridge University Press, 2019)
  • ‘Seville Cathedral’s Music in Performance, 1549–1599’, in Colin Lawson & Robin Stowell (eds), The Cambridge History of Musical Performance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012), pp. 353–74
  • Cristóbal de Morales: Sources, Inflences, Reception, co-edited with Bernadette Nelson (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2007)
  • ‘Adventures of Portuguese “Ancient Music” in Oxford, London, and Paris: Duarte Lobo’s Liber missarum and Musical Antiquarianism, 1650–1850’, Music & Letters 86 (2005), 42–73
  • Polyphony in Portugal c. 1530-c. 1620: Sources from the Monastery of Santa Cruz, Coimbra (New York & London: Garland, 1995)
  • ‘The English Background to Byrd’s Motets: Textual and Stylistic Models for Infelix ego’, in Byrd Studies (Cambridge University Press, 1992), pp. 24–50


Introduction

I am Professor of Financial Economics at the Saïd Business School and specialise in Asset Management, with a special focus on investments in private equity funds.

I hold degrees from INSEAD (PhD in Finance), the University of Southern California (Masters in both Mathematical Finance and Economics) and Toulouse University (BSc in Economics). After my PhD, and before joining Oxford University, I worked as an assistant professor (i.e. lecturer) and then as associate professor (i.e. reader) at the University of Amsterdam.

At Queen’s College, I am part of the wine committee and the investment committee.

Teaching

I teach the private equity course and the asset management course (which I created) for the School’s MBA, MFE and Executive MBA programmes. I also teach some executive courses in companies and at other universities.

Research

My research has received considerable attention from both the investment professional and academic community. My findings have been quoted in publications such as the Financial Times and The Economist, and have been published in top academic and practitioner journals, including Journal of Finance, Review of Financial Studies, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Harvard Business Review, Review of Finance and Financial Analyst Journal. All my papers can be downloaded on www.ssrn.com. I have consulted for a number of companies, including the Norway sovereign wealth fund, GPFG ̶ one of the largest investors worldwide.

Publications

  • Private equity performance and liquidity risk, 2012, with F. Franzoni and E. Novak, Journal of Finance.
  • A new approach to regulating private equity, 2012, with P. Morris, Journal of Corporate Law Studies.
  • A new method to estimate risk and return of non-traded assets from cash flows: The case of private equity funds, 2012, with T.C. Lin and J. Driessen, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis.
  • Venture capital funds: Performance persistence and flow-performance relation, 2010, Journal of Banking and Finance 34, 568-577
  • The performance of private equity funds, 2009, with O. Gottschalg, Review of Financial Studies 22(4):1747-1776
  • Beware when venturing into private equity, 2009, Journal of Economic Perspectives 23(1): 147–66


Introduction

I grew up in County Durham, went to Barnard Castle School and then studied Egyptology as an undergraduate at Queen’s. I stayed on to do a doctorate, and then taught at the Oriental Institute for a few terms before spending two years as a junior research fellow at University College. Oxford. I left this to become a curator in the Egyptian department at the British Museum for 23 years (where projects included the display of the Rosetta Stone and the Nebamun wall-paintings) before coming back to Queen’s in 2013.

Teaching

Much of my teaching is done centrally in the Griffith Institute and the Ashmolean Museum, where I teach a range of undergraduate and graduate courses, including lectures and tutorials on the history and culture of dynastic Egypt, Egyptian art and architecture, as well as museum classes studying artefacts. My favourite are classes where we read texts together. I supervise graduate students on a range of topics, and especially welcome literary ones.

Research

My main interest is ancient Egyptian poetry of the classic age (1940–1640 BC), and my research is very closely linked to my teaching of texts. As well as the philological study of manuscripts, I work on material contexts, actors’ perspectives, literary theory and modern receptions in literature, art and film. I am interested in issues of performance practice, cultural power, and sexuality in Ancient Egyptian culture, and from this I’ve also published on LGBT history across world cultures. I enjoy the experience of attempting an integrated reading of ancient texts, thinking about their emotional and intellectual impact on their audiences (both ancient and modern), and am working on a new commentary on The Tale of Sinuhe.

Publications

Please see my Faculty webpage for research updates and a full list of publications

Current research is focused on the Tale of Sinuhe and on issues of LGBTQ+ history; recent highlights include: 

Introduction

I received my BA in Mathematics from the University of Crete and my PhD from Columbia University in New York. After that I held positions at the University of Warwick, at the University of Paris-Sud and at the University of Athens. I came to Queen’s in 2009.

Teaching

I teach pure mathematics to first and second year students at Queen’s. I usually teach Linear Algebra and Groups, Fields and Rings to first year students and Group Theory, Fields, Number Theory and Multivariable Calculus to second year students.

Research

I started my research studying Group actions on Trees. I moved on to Geometric Group Theory a relatively new approach to infinite groups whereby one treats groups as geometric objects. This led me to questions related to topology and geometry. Some specific topics that I studied are JSJ-decompositions of groups, isoperimetric inequalities both for groups and spaces and non-positively curved groups.

Publications

  • Splittings and the asymptotic topology of the lamplighter group, Trans. AMS, vol. 364, p. 3861- 3873 (2012)
  • Codimension one subgroups and boundaries of hyperbolic groups, with T. Delzant. Groups, Geometry and Dynamics, vol. 4, issue 3, p. 533-548 (2010)
  • Boundaries and JSJ decompositions of CAT(0) groups, with E. Swenson. GAFA, Volume 19, Number 2 , p.558-590 (2009)
  • Cheeger constants of surfaces and isoperimetric inequalities, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 361 (2009), p. 5139-5162.
  • JSJ decompositions and complexes of groups with K.Fujiwara, GAFA v.16, n.1, p.70-125 (2006).
  • Quasi-isometry invariance of group splittings, Annals of Math. v.161, n. 2, p.759{830 (2005).


Introduction

After attending a state grammar school and 6th form college in Manchester, I studied metallurgy, economics and management at St Anne’s College, Oxford. I stayed on at St Anne’s to do a DPhil in materials. I then spent several years in the Materials Department in Oxford working first as a postdoctoral researcher, then as a departmental lecturer, including having teaching responsibilities at Pembroke College and a Junior Research Fellowship at Linacre College. In 2000, I was appointed to a lectureship in Oxford and a Fellowship at Queen’s.

Teaching

I tutor the first and second year material scientists at Queen’s, Corpus Christi and Mansfield colleges in aspects of phase transformations, microstructures and processing of materials. I also teach part of a third year options course in advanced manufacturing of metals and alloys. I supervise Part II (fourth year) materials undergraduates during their final year projects and graduate (DPhil) students.

Research

In my research I study solidification processing of advanced materials from laboratory scale through to pilot-scale processing plant. I have particular interests in controlling the grain structure of the metal, controlling the phases which form in the materials and in maintaining quality whilst re-cycling metals. My main focus is on working with aluminium alloys and intermetallics.

For more details and a list of current projects see my department webpage.

Publications

  • Sundaram Kumar, Sam Agarwal and Keyna O’Reilly, In-sity Al3Nb formation in liquid Al by Nb particle addition, Materials Science Forum 812, 10.4028 (2015)
  • F. Yan, S. Kumar, B.J. McKay and K.A.Q. O’Reilly, Effect of Mn on Fe containing phase formation in high purity aluminium, Int. J. of Cast Metals Research 27, 10.1179 (2014)
  • Jayesh B. Patel, Hu-Tian Li, Xia Mingxu, Simon Jones, Sundaram Kumar, Keyna O’Reilly and Zhongyun Fan, Melt conditioned direct chill casting (MD-DC) process for production of high quality aluminium alloy billets, Mat. Sci. Forum 794-796, 10,4028 (2014)
  • Tahsina Smith, Keyna O’Reilly, Sundaram Kumar and Ian Stone, Influence of grain-refiner addition on the morphology of Fe-bearing intermetallics in a semi-solid processed Al-Mg-Si alloy, Met. and Mat. Transactions A 44A, 10.1007 (2013)

Introduction

I was an undergraduate and clinical student at Queen’s and then worked in a number of London hospitals including Guy’s, Lewisham, St Thomas’, Hammersmith and the Royal Brompton hospital. I returned to Oxford for my doctoral studies as a Medical Research Council Training Fellow. Following further clinical training I took up a Medical Research Council Clinician Scientist Fellowship and then spent a number of years as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco and subsequently at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). I returned to Oxford in 2002, taking up a Medical Research Council Senior Fellowship in 2004, becoming a Reader in 2006 and Professor in 2011. I head a research group in the Nuffield Department of Medicine, practice clinical medicine as a consultant in general medicine and nephrology at the John Radcliffe and Churchill hospitals and teach clinical medical students. I completed a five-year term of office as Dean of the College in 2019 and I am Senior Treasurer of the Junior Common Room (JCR).

Teaching

At Queen’s I teach clinical medicine through a combination of bedside teaching in the hospital and tutorial teaching in the quieter atmosphere of college. I am a great believer in the value of the tutorial approach in the teaching of clinical medicine. I also supervise MSc and DPhil students in my research group.

Research

My research interest is in the role of the immune system in human disease. I am interested in understanding the recognition of diseased cells and using this knowledge to design new therapies. I am also interested in understanding chronic atherosclerotic vascular disease and chronic kidney disease and their genetic basis in order to improve their treatment. My laboratory uses a wide range of research approaches including structural, molecular and cellular biology, as well as studies involving patients.

Publications

For a full listing of my publications, please visit www.ccmp.ox.ac.uk/publications-3.